Medieval Logic
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Medieval Logic An Outline of Its Development from 1250 to C. 1400 by Philotheus Bohner

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Published by Hyperion Pr .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Logic, Medieval

Book details:

The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages130
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL8180746M
ISBN 100883556820
ISBN 109780883556825

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Historically, medieval logic is divided into the old logic (logica vetus), the tradition stretching from Boethius (c. –) until Abelard (–), and the new logic (logica nova), from the late twelfth century until the Renaissance. The division reflects the availability of ancient logical texts. Medieval logicians advanced far beyond the logic of Aristotle and the aim of this book is to show how far that advance took them in two central areas. This book focuses upon the work of some of the great figures of the 14th century, including Walter Burley, William Ockham, John Buridan, Albert of Saxony, and Paul of Venice, and deals with their theories of truth, conditions, and validity Author: Alexander Broadie. It is intended for anyone interested in mediaeval logic and philosophy broadly construed. Please note: As of March 9, , this site became "inactive" and will not be further updated. It will remain available on the web, in the hope that it will be useful. Because of "hackers," the "Forum" (discussion bulletin board) that was formerly found on. To say that medieval logic was systematic is not, of course, to say that it was constructed like a modern quasi-axiomatic system. There are no axioms and theorems, no formation rules and the like. Medieval logics were generally presented in the form of lists of rules of inference, often with little or no apparent heed for economy.

of the history of logic, must still remain over-theoretical and insufficiently histor-ical. What is most needed to illuminate the broadly human importance of the subject in this period (and in the twelfth to sixteenth centuries) is a social history of medieval logic, a type of study that has never until now been envisaged, let alone attempted. SOPHISMS IN MEDIEVAL LOGIC AND GRAMMAR: ACTS OF THE NINTH EUROPEAN SYMPOSIUM ON MEDIEVAL LOGIC AND SEMANTICS, HELD AT ST. ANDREWS, JUNE by READ, Stephen (Edits). and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at History of logic - History of logic - Medieval logic: As the Greco-Roman world disintegrated and gave way to the Middle Ages, knowledge of Greek declined in the West. Nevertheless, several authors served as transmitters of Greek learning to the Latin world. Among the earliest of them, Cicero (–43 bce) introduced Latin translations for technical Greek terms. The Cambridge Translations of Medieval Philosophical Texts. Vol. 1, Logic and the Philosophy of Language. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, E-mail Citation» This is the only anthology devoted to medieval logic, and it is a companion to The Cambridge History of Later Medieval Philosophy. Although it largely draws on works not.

The Summa Logicae ("Sum of Logic") is a textbook on logic by William of Ockham. It was written around Systematically, it resembles other works of medieval logic, organised under the basic headings of the Aristotelian Predicables, Categories, terms, propositions, and syllogisms. These headings, though often given in a different order. While for a long time the study of medieval logic focused on editorial projects and reconstructions of central medieval doctrines such as the theories of signification, supposition, consequences, and obligations, nowadays the spectrum of analysis has broadened and is increasingly informed by modern logical research, whose perspective is then applied to medieval logic. Medieval Logic. Albert of Saxony, Quaestiones Circa Logicam: Twenty-Five Disputed Questions on Logic by Michael J. Fitzgerald (Dallas Medieval Texts and Translations: Peeters Publishers) This translation of Albert of Saxony's Twenty-five Disputed Questions on Logic brings to English readers an important fourteenth-century logician's contribution to the analytic core issues in philosophy. Medieval logicians advanced far beyond the logic of Aristotle, and this book shows how far that advance took them in two central areas. Broadie focuses upon the work of some of the great figures of the fourteenth century, including Walter Burley, William Ockham, John Buridan, Albert ofSaxony, and Paul of Venice, and deals with their theories of.